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Infamous Bodies Early Black Women’s Celebrity and the Afterlives of Rights - Shared screen with speaker view
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
16:19
Hello, everyone!
Durba Mitra
18:59
YAY Prof Pinto!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
19:13
We’re on the move (for a year)!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
20:51
I’ve got things to say about Housewives. THIS PODCAST IS A GIFT.
Jessica Millward
21:28
It is indeed a gift :) to me as well. Let’s talk your work today though
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
36:28
Love that red back cover
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
36:32
which I had nothing to do with
Laura Kang
38:12
“Historians on Housewives.” Prof. Millward’s podcast. https://sites.uci.edu/activiststudiowest/
Laura Kang
38:38
https://historiansonhousewives.com/podcast
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
40:37
And Emily Owens would say it was about “sexual labor”
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
47:42
Clap for you brillance
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
47:46
your
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
47:49
And your work
Laura Kang
49:03
That was so generative on so many fronts. Thank you, Prof. Millward!
Dr. Willoughby-Herard (she/her/they/them)
50:02
Thank you so much for your work, Dr. Pinto. How are you creating space and pathways into the history field for the descendants of the women you study?
Dr. Willoughby-Herard (she/her/they/them)
51:34
I am driving a child to doctor appointments. Sorry,
Jessica Millward
54:30
Yes. Black women’s art and scholarship comes out of much vulnerability.
Jennifer Terry
56:50
If there is time I would like to ask Both Dr. Pinto and Dr. Milward to talk more about the concept and practice of assembling archives outside of the brick and mortar sites of control and white supremacy (e.g. the National Archives vs. assembling collections that will otherwise be destroyed, lost, invalidated, spectacularized).
Laura Kang
57:09
Please let me know if you would like to ask a question on camera or via chat!
Catherine Sameh (she/her)
57:38
I would love to ask a question about vulnerability on camera!
Jennifer Terry
01:00:48
Fantastic commentary on our current moment, Samantha. Thank you.
Bibi Bakare-Yusuf
01:01:00
Is there an art form or scholarship that does not come out of vulnerability? Or is it that others mask the vulnerability that's already inherent in knowledge production, but which because of Cartesianism we must eschew? The idea of vulnerability aligned to Blackness surely re-inscribe and imbue Blackness with emotion and embodiment which has been black women's relation to whiteness.
Jennifer Terry
01:02:43
Can we please save the chat thread, Jennifer Choy?
Laura Kang
01:05:34
I think sometimes we confuse the “familiar” with the “normative.”
Catherine Sameh (she/her)
01:07:19
Amazing. Thank you!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
01:07:50
CONGRATS ON YOUR JOB!!!!
Durba Mitra
01:08:59
yes to this great question.
Jessica Millward
01:09:20
@bibi, I believe that black women’s vulnerability was masked and had to be masked for various reasons up to a certain point in history. Or, Black women are robbed of the ability to be vulnerable because that equates to pain. The notion of the black woman’s superbody and reproducers of the enslaved population (in this context) could not exist legally alongside pain and vulnerability because that would negate the “chattel” element needed for chattel slavery. Though black women themselves clearly experienced pain etc.
Jennifer Terry
01:17:51
Wonderful event. Thanks!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
01:17:52
I’m happy to answer them on email or over Zoom Room!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
01:17:58
Sorry I spoke so long!
Catherine Sameh (she/her)
01:18:01
Such an amazing event!!!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
01:18:06
Bye, friends!
Samantha Pinto [she/her/hers]
01:18:07
Thank you!
Kathryn Schubert
01:18:07
Thank you!!
heidi tinsman she/ella
01:18:13
Thanks!
Jessica Millward
01:18:17
Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this great study!